This is a continuation of a previous article on domestic beef cattle breeds.

See the other articles:
Domestic Beef Cattle: Terminology and Breeds (Part 1)
Domestic Beef Cattle Breeds (Part 2)
Domestic Beef Cattle Breeds (Part 3)
Domestic Beef Cattle Breeds (Part 4)
Domestic Beef Cattle Breeds (Part 5)

 

Canadian Lynch Lineback

Canadian Lynch Lineback Cow

Canadian Lynch Lineback

Canadian Lynch Lineback Cows

31. Lineback (Canadian Lynch Lineback)

  • Origin: Canada (Ontario). There are actually at least three recognized breeds of Lineback cattle. Two are dairy breeds (Randall Lineback and American Dairy Lineback), and one is a dual-purpose meat and dairy (Canadian Lynch Lineback). The Canadian Lynch Lineback was a landrace breed kept by the Lynch family in Ontario.
  • Type: This is a dual-purpose meat and dairy breed, but was originally a triple-purpose breed for draft, meat, and dairy
  • Flavor: Well-marbled with a “nice flavor”
  • Size: Small.
  • Color: Black with white stripe down its back on its belly. The “line” is a recessive trait.
  • Horns: Horned or polled (naturally hornless).
  • Temperament: Very good… this is evidenced by the fact this breed was, and in some places still is, used for draft.
  • Notes: Produces well on pasture. Forages well. Hardy. Long-lived. Tolerates cold climates.

 

Lowline Cattle

Lowline Cattle (image used with gracious permission from Wessex Lowlines at wessexlowlines.com, click on the image to go to their site!)

Lowline Bull

Lowline Bull

32. Lowline

  • Origin: Australia. From Angus (originally from Scotland) cattle at the Trangie research center. The researchers were studying genetics, growth, and efficency in converting grass to meat. Groups of Angus were divided into three groups. One group was big and had fast growth (the “High” line), one was small and had low growth rates (the “Low” line), and there was also a control group. The researchers found that the High Line and Low Line had almost identical efficiency. The unintentional result of this research was a new breed (some consider it a strain of the Angus breed) of small, docile, efficient beef cattle.
  • Type: Meat.
  • Flavor: High-quality, well-marbled.
  • Size: Small.
  • Color: Black.
  • Horns: Polled (naturally hornless).
  • Temperament: Docile.
  • Notes: Easy calving. Low maintenance. Produces well on pasture.

 

Maine-Anjou Cow and Calf

Maine-Anjou Cow and Calf

Maine-Anjou Bull with Simmentel Cow

Maine-Anjou Bull with Simmental Cow

33. Maine-Anjou

  • Origin: France (from English Durnham and Mancelle cattle breeds) in 1908, near the Maine and Anjou rivers.
  • Type: Meat, although they were originally a dual-purpose meat and dairy breed.
  • Flavor: Well-marbled.
  • Size: Large (bulls 2,200-3,100 lbs/1,000-1,400 kg; cows 1,500-1,900 lbs/680-860 kg)
  • Color: DarkRed, Roan, or Black with or without white markings.
  • Horns: Horned or polled (naturally hornless).
  • Temperament: Very docile, quiet.
  • Notes: Fast growth.

 

Marchigiana Bull

Marchigiana Bull

Marchigiana Cows

Marchigiana Cows

34. Marchigiana

  • Origin: Italy, Marche region of Italy (from Podolian, Chianina, and Romagnola cattle breeds).
  • Type: Meat, although originally they were a dual-purpose beef and draft breed.
  • Flavor: Lean, but well-marbled, tender and flavorful
  • Size: Large.
  • Color: Light Gray to White with a dark nose, eye, and tail switch.
  • Horns: Horned or polled (naturally hornless).
  • Temperament: Mild.
  • Notes: Pronounced “MAR-key-JAH-nah”. Occasional double-muscling. Easy calving for a double-muscled breed. Good mothers. Good fertility. Developed to produce well on poor forage and rough terrain. Adaptable to cold and hot climates.

 

Murray Grey Bull

Murray Grey Bull

Murray Grey Cows

Murray Grey Cows

35. Murray Grey

  • Origin: Australia, near the Murray River. It was a chance mating of a Shorthorn cow and and Angus bull that produced 12, or 13 depending on the historian, calves that were gray (or “grey” if you are English/Australian!).
  • Type: Meat.
  • Flavor: Tender and well-marbled.
  • Size: Medium (bulls 1,800-2,500 lbs/800-1140 kg; cows 1,100-1,500 lbs/500-700 kg).
  • Color: Gray (“silver”) to Dun to Black, but has dark gray skin! This is a genetically dominant trait.
  • Horns: Polled (naturally hornless).
  • Temperament: Docile, but cows are protective of their calves.
  • Notes: Produces well on pasture. Tolerates a wide variety of climates. Good mothering. Easy calving. Known for excellent carcasses.

 

Normande Cow

Normande Cow

Normande Calves

Normande Calves

36. Normande

  • Origin: France, in the Normandy region, from ancient breeds, possibly originating from the Vikings!
  • Type: Dual-purpose meat and dairy. This is a primarily a “cheese” cow in France.
  • Flavor: Tender and well-marbled.
  • Size: Medium to Large (bulls average 2,400 lbs/1,100 kg; cows average 1,500 lbs/700 kg).
  • Color: White with red or black spots and spots over the eyes… they are considered “spectacled”.
  • Horns: Horned or polled (naturally hornless).
  • Temperament: Docile… it is mainly a dairy breed!
  • Notes: Hardy. High fertility. Easy calving. Adaptable to cold and hot climates. Good forager.

 

Parthenais Bull

Parthenais Bull

Parthenais Cow

Parthenais Cow

37. Parthenais

  • Origin: France, from the town of Parthenay in the Deux-Sèvres region (department).
  • Type: Meat, was originally a triple-purpose beef, dairy, and draft breed.
  • Flavor: Tender and lean.
  • Size: Medium to Large.
  • Color: Golden to Reddish-brown with light eyes, muzzle, and legs and dark noses, hooves, and tails.
  • Horns: Small.
  • Temperament: Docile.
  • Notes: Pronounced “PAR-ten-a”. Partial double-muscling which increases meat production, but still allows for relatively easy calving. High fertility.

 

Piedmontese Cow with Calf

Piedmontese Cow with Calf

Piedmontese Bull

Piedmontese Bull

38. Piedmontese

  • Origin: Italy, Piedmont region of Italy. Considered the oldest breed in Italy. Likely from a natural intrebreeding between the Aurochs (Bos taurus) from Europe and the Zebu (Bos indicus) from Asia
  • Type: Meat, although it is primarily a dual-purpose beef and dairy breed, with emphasis on the dairy, in Italy.
  • Flavor: Tender and lean.
  • Size: Medium.
  • Color: White to Gray with black eyes, nose, and tail switch. With black skin.
  • Horns: Horned and polled (naturally hornless).
  • Temperament: Docile.
  • Notes: Pronounced “peed-mon-TAY-say”. Double-muscling. Good production on pasture. Good forager. Adaptable to cold and hot climates.

 

Pineywoods Herd

Pineywoods Herd

Pineywoods Cow

Pineywoods Cow

39. Pineywoods

  • Origin: Southeastern United States (in the “piney” woods), originally brought to the Southern U.S. by Spanish Conquistadors in the 1500′s but likely has the addition of Angus, Charolais, Devon, and Shorthorn breeds early in its history (this is a point of contention for some historians).
  • Type: Meat.
  • Flavor: Leand and flavorful. Listed on the Slow Food USA’s Ark of Taste.
  • Size: Small to Medium (average 600-1,000 lbs/270-450 kg)
  • Color: Variety of colors and patterns.
  • Horns: Medium to large with various shapes.
  • Temperament: Docile. Gentle.
  • Notes: Heat and humidity resistant. Disease and pest resistant. Hardy. Forage very well (can thrive on rough pasture and brush). High fertility. Good mothering. Long-lived. Some cattle strains also are good milk producers. Pineywoods are known to be low-impact on watering sources like stream banks.

 

Pinzgauer Cows

Pinzgauer Cows

Pinzgauer Cows

Pinzgauer Cows

40. Pinzgauer

  • Origin: Alps of Austria, Germany, and Italy, but named for the Pinzgau region of Austria.
  • Type: Meat, was originally triple-purpose beef, dairy, and draft.
  • Flavor: Tender.
  • Size: Large (bulls 2,200-2,400 lbs/1,000-1,100kg; cows 1,300-1,550/600-700 kg)
  • Color: Brown to Dark Red with white backs, bellies, and tails.
  • Horns: Horned or polled (naturally hornless).
  • Temperament: Docile… still considered a dairy breed in some locations.
  • Notes: Pronounced “PINS-gouw-er”. Adaptable to cold and hot climates. Good mothering. Pest resistant.

 

Subscribe to TCPermaculture.com and receive updates whenever a new article is posted!

 

Photo References:

  • https://www.facebook.com/lynchlinebackcattle/photos_stream
  • http://wessexlowlines.blogspot.pt/2012_07_01_archive.html
  • http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/OWImWL0v8UY/maxresdefault.jpg
  • http://www.eaglebutteranch.com/web%2019%20w%20calf%20sm%20copy.JPG
  • http://www.myalbum.com/Foto-4AGK8DAM.jpg
  • http://www.cattlenetwork.net/images/breeds/marchigiana.jpg
  • http://marky.willadsenfamily.org/images/Marky_Meeting_002.jpg
  • http://www.bundaleerbeef.com.au/photos/wiltshire_crown_prince-Murray-Grey-Sire.jpg
  • http://www.nationalmurraygreyregistry.com/wwwroot/userfiles/images/cows9-1-08b.jpg
  • https://stanzebla.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/normannen.jpg
  • http://www.normandegenetics.com/newsletters/winter2010/calves.jpg
  • http://ulsterparthenaise.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/thomas-bull-fred.jpg
  • http://parthenais.tripod.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/crystal.jpg
  • http://www.irishpiemontesesociety.com/userimages/IMG_0971.JPG
  • http://www.piedmontese.org/09FD%20fullblood%20Piedmontese%20bull%20Field%20Days.jpg
  • http://kerrcenterdaytoday.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/026_sm.jpg
  • http://www.eldoradonews.com/content/uploads/pictures/2012/09/-0909cows.jpg
  • http://www.rogerclarke.com/Gallery/IMG_0151.Cows+path.*.jpg
  • http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-oUchi-nguP4/UJByOh_ms1I/AAAAAAAAATQ/ilpHHaL-Ce8/s1600/Two+Pinzgauer+Cows.jpg