Also known as Calabash or Bottle Gourds, Lagenaria siceraria are hardshelled gourds have been used for multiple purposes around the world. Many varieties are edible: edible fruit, edible seeds, edible leaves. Many varieties are hollowed out after they are dried. These are used as bowls, cups, bottles for water, storage containers for rice, serving dishes, serving spoons, water pipes, musical instruments, and more.

One of our Birdhouse Gourds.

The variety of Lagenaria siceraria we grew this year has been developed to make birdhouses, hence the name Birdhouse Gourds. Of all the squash/melons we grew this year, these plants were the most disease resistant and prolific. Almost no pests. And very late to developing any mildew.

Storing our Birdhouse Gourds in cardboard boxes.

We just harvested about half the gourds that had dried stems. The other half still have just a bit more maturing to do. We will let them dry out in our garage for the next 4-6 months. They are dried when the seeds rattle inside. Once they are dried, we will drill a hole in the side for an entrance. We will scrape out what we can, but the birds will do a pretty good job of cleaning out what we don’t get. We will also drill a number of small holes in the bottom for air circulation. Many people paint the dried gourds with a variety of colors and patterns, but a simple varnish or coating of white paint will also be sufficient to seal the gourds to help prevent rot. If sealed well and cared for in the off-season, these natural birdhouses can last for many years.

For best storage, the gourds should not touch each other.

I’ll share some more photos when we make convert these gourds to birdhouses… now we just have to wait 6 months!

 

All photos in this article are ours. If you would like to use one, please let me know!

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