Following is a list of all mammal species I have identified on or just outside our farm, the Bauernhof Kitsteiner. I have included a few species that have been identified just off of our property for a few.

I will be adding to this list as I am able to confirm the different species on the farm.

  1. American Black Bear (Ursus americanus): We have seen Black Bears a few times within a few miles of our farm. One of our neighbors spotted a female bear with three cubs in the Spring/Summer just on the other side of our northeastern property fence. These bears can climb trees easily, so there is no reason to think our fence will keep them out. But we have not seen any bears on our property so far. Black Bears have been known to attack humans, so if you see one, keep your distance.
  2. Bobcat (Lynx rufus): We have at least one of these beautiful cats living in the forest on the farm. They are quite a bit larger than a domestic house cat, but not nearly as large as a cougar. These cats are very secretive and are almost never seen. We have only identified our Bobcat from nighttime game cam images. There are almost no incidents of Bobcats attacking a human.
  3. Cottontail Rabbit (One of two species: Appalachian Cottontail (Sylvilagus obscurus) or Eastern Cottontail Rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus). These two rabbit species’ ranges overlap in our area. The Appalachian Cottontail is a very rare rabbit, but these two species are almost impossible to differentiate without detailed skull and dental evaluations or even genetic testing.)
  4. Coyote (Canis latrans): Before we bought our farm, the previous owners used to stock the farm with Coyotes for hunting. We have a great perimeter fence that usually keeps Coyotes out, but occasionally they will find their way onto our property. Generally, Coyotes avoid human interaction, but if you see one, it is still a good idea to keep your distance.
  5. Deermouse (One of three species: North American Deermouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cotton Deermouse (Peromyscus gossypinus), or White-Footed Deermouse (Peromyscus leucopus). These species are almost impossible to differentiate without detailed skull and dental evaluations.)
  6. Eastern Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger): These large tree squirrels are usually gray with an orange or yellowish tint. They are big squirrels!
  7. Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis): These are very common squirrels seen throughout eastern North America.
  8. Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus): This is a small fox with a gray coloring that can sometimes be mistaken for a coyote, but coyotes are much larger. I have seen these foxes just outside our property, but since they can climb trees, I am sure it is just a matter of time before we see one on the farm itself.
  9. Hispid Cotton Rat (Sigmodon hispidus): These brown, wire-haired, native North American rats are common in our grassy pastures.
  10. House Mouse (Mus musculus): Not usually seen inside our house, despite its name, but they are seen in the garage and shed stealing as much feed and seed as they can!
  11. North American or Virginia Opossum (Didelphis virginiana): These native North American marsupials are common through the state. We see them fairly frequently on the farm. They love persimmons!
  12. Raccoon (Procyon lotor): Only seen at night on the game cams, we have quite a few Racoons in our woods.
  13. Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes): These beautiful foxes are common in Tennessee. They are rarely seen during the day.  I have seen these foxes just outside our property, so I am sure it is just a matter of time before we see one on the farm itself.
  14. Short-Tailed Shrew (One of two species: Southern (Blarina carolinensis) or the Northern (Blarina brevicauda). These are almost impossible to differentiate without detailed skull and dental evaluations.) They can be occasionally be found in the pastures.
  15. Striped Skunk (Mephitis mephitis): This is the “classic” skunk often seen in cartoons. They have been seen multiple times on the farm, but are typically nocturnal. The Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius) is a smaller, more rare species of skunk that also lives in our area, but we have not seen one on the farm yet.
  16. White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus): These deer are occasionally seen on the farm, most often in the woods. But they will occasionally be seen in the pastures during breeding season.
  17. Woodchuck/Groundhog (Marmota monax): This is the largest member of the squirrel family and are common through Tennessee. They are only occasionally seen on the farm in the pastures and near the ponds or the valleys leading to the ponds.
  18. Woodrat (One of two species: Allegheny Woodrat (Neotoma magister) or Eastern Woodrat (Neotoma floridana). These species are almost impossible to differentiate without detailed skull and dental evaluations.)